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Aboriginal Community Police Officers

Warning: May contain images and names of Aboriginal people who have died.

A Narrative of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders Service in the Northern Territory Police Force 1870-2009

The following material is from the draft manuscript written and supplied by NT Police Superintendent Tony Fuller

The ACPOs expanded role today reflects the nature of the Territory where about 28 percent of people are Aboriginal and many live a traditional lifestyle at remote communities and outstations.

In 1993 the ACPO Scheme was reviewed in a joint project between NT Police, the Office of Multi Cultural Affairs (Commonwealth) and the Office of Sport, Recreation and Ethnic Affairs (NT) (Bathgate and O’Neill). 


Aboriginal Community Police Officers – Terms and Conditions of Employment – Discussion Paper was compiled by then, Sergeant Ian Lea and released. In this paper he raised the issues of providing specific training for ACPOs to transition into mainstream Policing.[1] There have been a number of applicants from ACPO and Police Aides who have had a desire to transfer to mainstream Policing who for a variety of reasons where unable to progress. These applicants included ACPOs Sandy, Tipiloura, Law, Willets, Alice and Casey as early as 1982 however satisfactory support programs and Policy where not in place. ACPO Willets to his credit though did progress and was successful in reaching Constable level. These members should not be remembered as failures but as pioneers who started a trend that brought about significant change in the organisation.

On 7 October 2003 the Police Arbitral Tribunal certified a Consent Agreement negotiated under Clause 53 of the Police Consent Agreement 2001. The new Consent Agreement provides enhanced salary and promotional opportunities for those Aboriginal Community Police Officers (ACPOs) who obtain qualifications under the Public Safety (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Policing) Training Package.

In accordance with the new Consent Agreement, the salary and advancement provisions for the ranks of ACPO, ACPO First Class and Senior ACPO shown in Attachment A (A.1 and A.2) of Consent Agreement 2001 are deleted and, effective from 7 October 2003, replaced by this pay scale


Conditions for advancement:
 

(1) an ACPO who achieves Certificate II under the Public Safety (ATSI Community Policing) Training Package may be advanced one salary increment.

 

(2) an ACPO may be promoted to ACPO First Class after 4 years service, or on gaining Certificate III under the Public Safety (ATSI Community Policing) Training Package.

 

(3) an ACPO First Class may be promoted to Senior ACPO after 6 years service as ACPO First Class or on gaining Certificate IV under the Public Safety (ATSI Community Policing) Training Package.

 

(4) Increment is only available if the Senior ACPO has Certificate IV.

Aboriginal and Ethnic Services Unit

The Aboriginal and Ethnic Services Unit was established in 1994 to ensure that the needs of people from Aboriginal and non-English speaking backgrounds were considered in departmental policy decisions. It oversaw and reported on the implementation of the recommendations arising from the Royal Commission Into Aboriginal Deaths In Custody as well as other Federal Ministerial Council initiatives on Aboriginal and non-English speaking issues.

The Unit had policy responsibility for the management and oversight of the Aboriginal Community Police Officer (ACPO) Scheme, including recruitment, training and development of ACPOs. The Unit also provided advice and support for community based policing programs throughout the Northern Territory.

From late 1996 the Aboriginal and Ethnic Services Unit and the Development Unit of the PFES College worked on a training and career development strategy for the ACPOs. This resulted in an accredited training program for ACPOs, Certificates ii to iv qualifications in Aboriginal Community Policing which allowed the Department to access special purpose funding through the New Apprenticeships Scheme to cover the cost of training.

Staffing of the Indigenous Policing Development unit (IPDU) was reported as an issue that had been neglected. The model of 1 x Sergeant, 1x ACPO and 1 x AO5 was insufficient to cover the expected duties of the office and staffing later increased to a Superintendent, a Sergeant and an Aboriginal Liaison Officer (ALO).

One of the projects the unit commenced was the “Kick A Goal For Road Safety” strategy which was implemented in 1998, the partnerships generated through consultation with community groups, agencies and other government departments, in particular the Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment (DIPE) and NT Road Safety Council, proved invaluable in promoting community ownership of Aboriginal road safety programs.

This partnership arrangement was enhanced with the secondment of Craig Cawood from DIPE to NTPFES for a period of 12 months. Aboriginal road safety messages were broadcast throughout the NT over the 2002/03 Christmas period utilising radio and television media outlets including Imparja Television, Warlpiri Media Association, CAAMA Radio 8kinFM, Radio Larrakia, 104.9 and TEABBA Radio. The messages were developed using ACPOs and Aboriginal interpreters.[2] 

Maranboy Project

Another Project undertaken was the Maranboy Project. The concept of Aboriginalisation of the Maranboy Police District (Jawoyn Homelands) was a recommendation arising from the McAulay-Bowe Review of the NT Police Force in 1995. The Jawoyn people supported the concept and in September 1996, a formal approach to Commissioner Bates was made through the Northern Land Council for the commencement of a pilot project. From a project perspective, it was crucial that local Aboriginal people were positive and supportive of the concept thereby ensuring their participation and more importantly, ownership of the process. It was recognised that, without this commitment from the Jawoyn people, a favourable outcome would be very difficult to achieve.

The project aims were the selection, development and ultimately the appointment of Aboriginal people from local communities in the region to become the Officer in Charge, second member and Aboriginal Community Police Officers (ACPOs). These people would be responsible for the day to day management and staffing of the Maranboy Police Station and responsible for policing of the entire Jawoyn homelands.

Unfortunately this project did not succeed and faded into obscurity. Some of the issues identified were that the ACPOs working at Beswick and Barunga at the time, who were selected as part of the Maranboy project did not have nor were they ever likely to acquire the skills necessary to pass the recruit constable selection criteria or training. It was reported that while the concept of having Aboriginal people running a Police Station may be appealing the reality is Aboriginal people possessing the skills and knowledge to undertake and complete the constable recruit training competently are unlikely to want to remain in their Communities.

It was recognized that ACPOs living and working in their Communities play a difficult and unattractive role with the constant stress of family disputes/pressures, sometimes they lack respect/status and are always the first port of call for all complaints 24hours a day. It is generally acknowledged throughout the Aboriginal Community that those with the necessary education and skills to perform such tasks tend to live elsewhere. [3]
Indigenous Policing Development Unit (IPDU) - 2005

Development Studies were given the responsibility for IPDU. This involved the foundation training and in-service training for Aboriginal Community Police Officers (ACPO) but not policy development which was the responsibility of the Operational Command.

The Unit was staffed by B/Sergeant Michael Moss, Keith Bethel (AO4) and Senior ACPO Joe Russell. 

Indigenous Policing Development Division (IPDD)

During 2005 a number of projects were undertaken by the Leadership Development Program (LDP) in the Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Services (NTPFES), this included, Indigenous Youth Initiatives and an Indigenous Constables Training Program. In addition, the Lookrukins – the Indigenous Women’s Leadership Program, was undertaken by five NTPFES employees who undertook a project with regard to Indigenous Cadetships.

In August 2006, LDP (2005) presented the Indigenous Police Constables Training Program to the Executive Leadership Group (ELG). Following this presentation the ELG approved the implementation of an Indigenous Policing Unit and the development and delivery of an Indigenous Constable’s Program for 2006/2007.

Prior to this formal approval the Assistant Commissioner Human Resources, Mr McAdie, the Directors Human Resource Development and Human Resource Management recommended an Indigenous Policing Development unit be placed under the HRD Command, utilising existing staff from a number of areas, specifically:

 

  • 1 x Superintendent - Manager 

  • 1 x AO8 – Program Initiatives & Grant Funding 

  • 2 x Sergeant’s – Indigenous Workforce Development 

  • 1 x AO7 – HR Policy & Coordinator School Based Apprenticeships 

  • 2 x AO5 - Urban & Remote Liaison Officers 

  • 1 x Professional 2 – Curriculum, Assessment & E Learning Initiatives 

  • 1 x ACPO 

  • 1 x AO2 – Administration 


During September 2006 the ELG approved the implementation of the Indigenous Policing Development Division - Yidiyu initiative. The ELG also approved that an Indigenous Constables Course be undertaken during 2007. The Commissioner specifically stated that he wanted commencement by about mid year however this course did not eventuate due to Industrial issues.

The Superintendent Yidiyu commenced in the Division on 8 January 2007 effectively commencing the Division, with additional staff following. At present the Division is staffed by;

  • 1 x Superintendent - Manager 

  • 2 x Sergeant’s – Indigenous Workforce Development 

  • 1 x AO7 – HR Policy & Coordinator School Based Apprenticeships (Vacant) 

  • 2 x AO5 - Urban & Remote Liaison Officers 

  • 1 x ACPO 

  • 1 x AO2 – Administration (Temporary) 

"Yidiyu" is from the Ngaliwurru people of Timber Creek, meaning "us mob sitting talking and learning together".

The role of the Division is to progress the development and delivery of:

 

  • Indigenous Constable’s Program, 

  • Indigenous Youth Initiatives, 

  • Take responsibility for Indigenous policy development, 

  • Aboriginal Community Police Officer - (ACPO) training and development, 

  • Transitional Programs for ACPO’s to Constables, 

  • Indigenous School Based Apprenticeship, 

  • Traineeship programs, 

  • Development of the Indigenous Employment & Career Development Strategy (IECDS), 

  • Assisting and guiding all Indigenous Staff within the Tri-Service of the NTPFES. 

Yidiyu also manage the recruitment, training and coordination of the ACPO Squads during their residential periods as well as during the work placements. As part of the recruitment role the Superintendent of Yidiyu is the Chair of all Police Recruit Panels and is responsible for identifying potential Indigenous Employees and identifying alternative career paths for these applicants. The Division is also responsible for providing guidance and establishing working partnerships with key Police Stations to coordinate the role of the mentors, coaches and workplace assessments.

TACPO Squad 95

In February 2008, 14 current serving ACPO’s commenced at the Police College on a 17 week ACPO to Constable, Transitional Program (TACPO). The course was designed to bring the members up to Constable level. To ensure that this could occur applicants were advised that they would become part of a shadow course to ACPO Squad 14. The applicants had to complete on line examinations in line with the study undertaken by ACPO Squad 14. The members were also required to met a minimum of 50 points in the physical assessment. Of the 29 original applicants 14 successfully achieved this result. This included two members of ACPO Squad 14 who were included in Squad 95.

Source image from p 35 - TACPO Squad 95 – Group photo

The Course commenced on the 11th February 2008 in Darwin. Participants came from Darwin (10), Alice Springs (2), and one each from Mutijulu and Tennant Creek. Thirteen members graduated on the 5th June 2008.

This Squad was historical on a number of fronts. The first is that it is understood to be the first Squad of Indigenous Constables to Graduate in Australia. It also took the number of Indigenous Constables and above from ten to twenty three.

Of a lesser historical value is the fact that this is the first squad known were two brothers have graduated together. John and Eric Morrison both formerly of Katherine overcome their low physical fitness results to gain entry and then graduate together. Lastly Nicolette Krepapas graduated whose mother is ACPO Betty Herbert of Groote Eylandt. This mother and daughter combination breaking new ground for the people of Groote Eylandt.

 

Squad 95 Graduates

Name ACPO Number Constable Number Posting

Albert  Tilmouth    7266 2926 Alice Springs

Jason Everingham 7229 2917 Alice Springs

David McCarthy 7262 2927 Alice Springs

Camella Gray 7259 2918 Tennant Creek

Kerin Souey 7255 2644 Palmerston

Nicolette Krepapas 7248 2920 Casuarina

Jimmy Lolias 7201 2921 Casuarina

Eric Morrison 7250 2922 Casuarina

John Morrison 7217 2923 Palmerston

David D’Antoine 7242 2916 Darwin

Daniel Hopkins 7294 2919 Darwin

Alphonsus Shields 7300 2925 Palmerston

Patrick Perkins 7219 2924 Darwin


Note: Chronology of events moved to NT Police Timeline

Honour Board

Indigenous members have been the recipients of many accolades over the past 130 plus years. During the research of this book several records were located of Trackers who had died or where killed whilst serving. Those names have been added to the list of Indigenous members who have died whilst serving in the modern era. Thankfully given the years of service this list is relatively small.

Included in this part are modern awards that recognise the service of members as well as exerts of Commissioners Commendations and Certificates of appreciation that celebrate the acts of bravery or achievement of a number of members.
Indigenous members who have died whilst serving 

 

Table 10 - Indigenous members who have died whilst serving

Aboriginal Community Police Officer Administrator Medal

In recognition of Aboriginal Community Police Officers service to their community and in line with the Police Officer of the Year Awards an Administrators medal was started in 2002 with the first recipient being ACPO First Class Don ST CLAIR. The following are the recipients to date.

Table 11 - ACPO of the year past recipients

Commissioner's Commendations

The following is a collection of Commissioners Commendations and awards awarded to Indigenous employees, ranging from disarming armed offenders to saving peoples lives. 


Commissioner Commendation: Police Aide Noel Mangurra

The Commissioner of Police has commended Police Aide Noel MANGURRA for his handling of an incident at Numbulwar in November 1981. Police Aide MANGURRA intervened in a tribal dispute, disarmed one person armed with a shotgun and ensured all innocent parties who may have been endangered by such a confrontation, were kept out of harms way, by having thee attend a film evening.

His actions in this incident vindicate both the Police Force and his community’s trust and faith in his ability to keep law and order within the community.[1]
Commissioner Commendation: Police Aide Timothy Mangurra

On 17th December 1981 at Anurugu, Groote Eylandt, Constable Materna and Police Aide Timothy MANGURRA investigated a complaint that a man was armed with a spear and was under the influence of liquor.

On arrival the man was found to be armed with two shovel nosed spears, one of which was set in a woomera ready for instant use. Some of the elderly members of the community were following the armed man and were attempting to persuade him to put the spears down. However, they did not venture too close as they obviously feared for their safety.

Constable Materna and Police Aide Mangurra spoke to the armed man for approximately 20 minutes in an effort to reason with him, without success. The armed man continued to threaten them whenever they came to close, however when he came within approximately 4 metres from the Police Vehicle, Police Aide MANGURRA dashed towards the armed man and disarmed him, broke both spears to prevent future use, then restrained the man until taken into custody. The man was later charged with being armed with an offensive weapon, escape lawful custody and other related charges.

Police Aide MANGURRA’s brave actions, in all probability saved other people from serious injury. His exceptional alertness, bravery and devotion to duty are a credit to himself and the Police Force and reinforce in the community the worthwhile contribution given by Police Aides. 

Commissioners Commendation: Tracker Donald Baban.

On 6 February 1982, Constables J.L. HAYES and S.J. FENSOM were on duty at a Football match in the Gardens Oval. At about 1600 hours the members were approached by a man who complained of chest pains and was clutching his chest. As the members were assisting the man to the Office of the Northern Territory Football League, he collapsed. Constable FENSOM quickly ascertained that the man had no detectable pulse. He then ran to telephone for medical assistance. Constable HAYES commenced external heart massage.

Tracker D. BABAN, a spectator at the football, immediately came to assist Constable HAYES, and took over he external heart massage whilst Constable HAYES gave mouth to mouth resuscitation.

Due to the prompt actions of Constable HAYES and Tracker BABAN, after several minutes the man regained consciousness, and was comforted until conveyed to Hospital by Ambulance The man has since expressed his sincere gratitude.
The assistance rendered by Tracker D. BABAN was no doubt instrumental in saving the life of the sick man. His unsolicited aid to members of the Northern Territory Police Force is commendable. 

Commissioners Commendation: Tracker Donald Baban.

On 6 February 1982, Constables J.L. HAYES and S.J. FENSOM were on duty at a Football match in the Gardens Oval. At about 1600 hours the members were approached by a man who complained of chest pains and was clutching his chest. As the members were assisting the man to the Office of the Northern Territory Football League, he collapsed. Constable FENSOM quickly ascertained that the man had no detectable pulse. He then ran to telephone for medical assistance. Constable HAYES commenced external heart massage.

Tracker D. BABAN, a spectator at the football, immediately came to assist Constable HAYES, and took over he external heart massage whilst Constable HAYES gave mouth to mouth resuscitation.

Due to the prompt actions of Constable HAYES and Tracker BABAN, after several minutes the man regained consciousness, and was comforted until conveyed to Hospital by Ambulance The man has since expressed his sincere gratitude.
The assistance rendered by Tracker D. BABAN was no doubt instrumental in saving the life of the sick man. His unsolicited aid to members of the Northern Territory Police Force is commendable. 

Commissioners Letter of Recognition – ACPO Garry Doonga Mununnggurritj

I have been told about your actions on the night of Friday 9 September 1994 when you and Victor Sandy initiated the arrest of an armed man at Yirrkala.

You showed good common sense and judgement when the man became violent, by retreating to a safe place and calling Nhulunbuy Police. To remain calm and continue doing your duty even though you were wounded also showed a high level of courage.

Your performance during this incident has earned you the respect of your community and the Police Service, and I wish you a full ande rapid recovery from the injury sustained.

Brian C Bates
Commissioner of Police
13 September 1994 

Commissioners Letter of Commendation- ACPO Garry Doonga Munnungurritj

On Saturday 25 March 1995, you and Aboriginal Community Police Officer Allan Lawson were called to a dispute at Yirrkala.

On arrival at Yirrkala, you saw a man hanging from a mango tree by a garden hose. While Aboriginal Community Police Officer Lawson lifted the man, with some difficulty you removed the hose from the tree and lowered him to the ground. You both rendered first aid before he was conveyed by ambulance to Gove District Hospital.

Your actions were a credit to you and this Service, and I commend you for your quick actions in saving a life.

Brian C Bates
Commissioner of Police
24 August 1995

Commissioners letter of Commendation – ACPO Alan Lawson

On Saturday 25 March 1995, you and Aboriginal Community Police Officer Garry Mununggurritj were called to a dispute at Yirrkala.

On arrival at Yirrkala, you saw a man hanging from a mango tree by a garden hose. While you lifted the man, with some difficulty Aboriginal Community Police Officer Garry Mununggurritj removed the hose from the tree and lowered him to the ground. You both rendered first aid before he was conveyed by ambulance to the Gove District Hospital.

Your actions were a credit to you and this Service, and I commend you for your quick actions in saving a life.

Brian Bates
Commissioner
24 August 1995

Commissioner Commendation – ACPO Ernest Perdjert

In recognition of your commendable actions as set out below:

On the night of the 11/12 March 1995, a series of violent disturbances occurred in the community of Wadeye.

As a result of those events, property damage occurred amounting to several hundreds of thousands of dollars, most of which centred upon the Mirrinnpatha Social Club.

During the course of the night you attended at the Mirrinnpatha Social Club along with Sergeant Geoffrey Sullivan. Although the club was under attack by several hundred people, apparently intent on destroying it and looting its contents, you along with Sergeant Sullivan, attempted to deal with the situation, even after it was necessary for Sergeant Sullivan to fire several warning shots from his shotgun as a number of the community members were discharging shotguns in your close vicinity.

On several occasions you faced the crowd directly in an attempt to quieten the situation and on another occasion made your way through the crowd, showing a great deal of courage, to advise the families of members stationed at Wadeye to lock themselves in their houses.

Your behaviour demonstrated a high degree of self-control, professionalism, determination, courage and perseverance. I commend you for your actions under most arduous and dangerous circumstances.

Brian Bates
Commissioner of Police
29 September 1995

Commissioner’s Commendation: ACPO Pamela Warlapinni

In recognition of your commendable actions as set as below:

On the night of 16 April 1995 you attended a violent domestic disturbance which occurred in the community of Milikapiti.

On arrival at the scene you were confronted by a man armed with an axe who was intoxicated and extremely aggressive. The man’s wife and child were in the house and after calming him down you were able to enter the house to ascertain the situation of the woman and child.

Having discovered that they had fled the house you continued speaking to the man and further calmed him before leaving to provide a place of safety at your own residence for the man’s wife and child. The man was eventually arrested by police from Pularumpi.

Your actions demonstrated a high degree of professionalism, determination, courage and perseverance. I commend you for your actions under most arduous and dangerous circumstances.

Brian C Bates
Commissioner of Police
29 September 1995

Commissioners Letter of Recognition – ACPO Lorraine Jones


I have been advised that you and other members from Katherine Police Station and Darwin CIB exhibited a high degree of professionalism and dedication in investigating several crimes and apprehending offenders during the recent spate of serious crimes in Katherine.

Too often we forget to acknowledge the good work done by members. Congratulations on a job well done.

Brian C Bates
Commissioner of Police
9 October 1997

Commissioner’s Commendation: ACPO Noel Dixon

In recognition of exceptional bravery in extremely perilous circumstances when late at night on 15 March 1999 you waded waist deep for about 60 metres in the poorly lit, crocodile infested, flooded McArthur River to rescue a person. Your bravery prevented a possible tragic outcome.

This 14th day of April 1999

Brian C Bates
Commissioner of Police

Commissioner’s Commendation: ACPO Graham Turner

On 4 January 1999, during a meeting of tribal elders at Ngukurr, you put your life at risk by placing yourself in front of others when threatened by a person with a firearm. You successfully negotiated with this person and he eventually put the firearm down. Your action displayed courage and professionalism of a high order in an extremely dangerous situation.

This 11th day of August 1999

Brian C Bates
Commissioner of Police

Commissioners Letter of Recognition: ACPO John Leslie Daly

On the evening of Thursday the 31st August 2000, Walter Reinhold was apprehended by Brevet Sergeant Raymond Musgrave and Constable Geoffrey Meng driving a white landcruiser on the Daly River Road. A search of the vehicle located a commercial quantity of cannabis and implements, that indicated that a cannabis crop might be located in the area.

Walter Reinhold and another person in the vehicle were apprehended and later questioned by members of the Drug Enforcement Unit. Reinhold refused to disclose the whereabouts of the plantation and despite an extensive land and air search around his camp, no crop was located.

On Sunday 17 September 2000, you attended at Daly River with Brevet Sergeant Musgrave on your day off and conducted a further search of the area. Later that day you located tracks leading away from the camp and followed those until nightfall prevented the search continuing. On 21 September 2000 you returned to the site with TRG members, where you followed the same tracks and located a well maintained and camouflaged cannabis plantation containing over 900 plants. A further 15 Kg of dried cannabis leaf was also discovered at the site.

Without your skill and commitment, it is unlikely that the plantation would have been discovered. You are to be commended for your effort in locating the plantation and for the dedication displayed in undertaking the search in your own time whilst off duty. That effort has resulted in Walter Reinhold being arrested and further charged with offences relating to the cannabis plantation.

Brian C Bates
Commissioner of Police
25 June 2001

Commissioners Commendation: ACPO John Leslie Daly

In recognition of conspicuous performance when on Tuesday the 20th February 2001, without concern for your own safety, you swam into Rapid Creek to rescue a drowning man. Once you had retrieved the unconscious man from the water, you and your partner then successfully performed Emergency Airway Resuscitation procedures after he had ceased to breath. Your actions resulted in the safe rescue and resuscitation of the man from what was an extremely dangerous and potentially life threatening situation.

Brian C bates
Commissioner of Police
25 June 2001
 

 

 


Commissioners Commendation: Constable Brendan Tom O’Hara

In recognition of conspicuous performance when, on Tuesday 19 March 2002, you successfully performed cardio-pulminary resuscitation on Mr Yamazae Luta who was found hanging by his neck in a shower cubicle of the sobering up shelter at Coconut Grove. Mr Luta owes his life to the excellent efforts of you and Mr Sullim Sallik, who assisted.

Paul White
Commissioner of Police
 

 


Commissioners Letter of Recognition: Constable Brendan O’Hara

At about 10.30pm on the evening of Tuesday 19 March 2002, you attended the Coconut Grove Sobering Up Shelter. Whilst you were at the reception area, a member of the staff, Mr Sallik, discovered that a client of the shelter, Yamazae LUTA, was hanging by his neck in a shower cubicle.

Mr Luta was cut down with your help. On discovering that he had no vital life signs and, with the assistance of Mr Sallik, you commenced cardio-pulmonary resuscitation immediately. You continued performing CPR for about four minutes until it was evident that the person was breathing on his own and his pulse had returned to normal.

It is clear that your prompt and level headed actions on that evening saved Mr Luta's life.

Please accept my congratulations and recognition of your actions on the evening in question.

Paul White
Commissioner of Police
 

 

Commissioners Commendation: ACPO Andrew Spencer

In recognition of your actions on Thursday 18 April 2002, when you displayed outstanding personal courage resulting in personal injury, while attempting to restrain and disarm an armed offender at Kintore Community. Your actions resulted in a dangerous and escalating situation being resolved. I commend your courage, presence of mind and actions on this occasion.

Paul White
Commissioner of Police

 

 



Commissioners Letter of Recognition – ACPO Roy Curtis

On 11 May 2002 Johnny Pitjara Club escaped from Alice Springs Prison after serving eighteen days of an eight-month prison sentence. Club soon left the Alice Springs area and headed to the Boundary Bore Community in the Harts Range Police District.

On 23 May 2002 Johnny Club was recaptured at Boundary Bore. The recapture ended a thirteen-day operation involving police from Alice Springs, Harts Range, Ti-Tree and Yuendumu.

After reported sightings of Johnny Club near Boundary Bore you and ex ACPO Riley Presley were requested by Ti-Tree Police to help track the escapee. On arrival at the Boundary Bore Community you assisted in the search by locating and tracking Club’s footprints for several hours. You followed tracks leading out of the community towards a nearby outstation. The terrain was extremely rough and the tracks became difficult to follow. A thorough search of the area indicated that Club had not reached this outstation but had headed back to Boundary Bore. This was confirmed on your return to the community where fresh tracks of Club’s were located.

There is little doubt that your perseverance in tracking the escapee greatly assisted in the recapture of Johnny Club. Your efforts and dedication are to be commended.

Incidents such as this highlight the value of Aboriginal tracking skills. Such skills and expertise are highly regarded and acknowledged as valuable tools that can assist both police and the community in the location of offenders and lost and missing persons.

Paul White
Commissioner of Police
 

 

Commissioners Letter of Appreciation – Former ACPO , Mr Riley Presley

On 11 May 2002 Johnny Pitjara Club escaped from Alice Springs Prison after serving eighteen days of an eight-month prison sentence. Club soon left the Alice Springs area and headed to the Boundary Bore Community in the Harts Range Police District.

On 23 May 2002 Johnny Club was recaptured at Boundary Bore. The recapture ended a thirteen-day operation involving police from Alice Springs, Harts Range, Ti-Tree and Yuendumu.

After reported sightings of Johnny Club near Boundary Bore you and ACPO Roy Curtis were requested by Ti-Tree Police to help track the escapee. You assisted in the search at Boundary Bore Community by tracking Club’s footprints for several hours. You both followed tracks leading out of the Boundary Bore community towards another outstation. The terrain was extremely rough and the tracks became difficult to follow. A thorough search of the area indicated that Club had not reached this outstation but had headed back to Boundary Bore. This was confirmed on your return to Boundary Bore where fresh tracks of Club’s were located.

There is little doubt that your perseverance in tracking the escapee assisted in the recapture of Johnny Club. That you volunteered to assist in a difficult and often arduous task is greatly appreciated.

Incidents such as this highlight the value of Aboriginal tracking skills. Such skills and expertise are highly regarded and acknowledged as valuable tools that can assist both police and the community in the location of offenders and lost and missing persons.

Paul White
Commissioner of Police 

 


Commissioners Letter of Recognition: ACPO William Robert David

I would like to take this opportunity to formally recognise your outstanding performance of duty as set out below.

At 10.30pm on Thursday 6 June 2002, while conducting a patrol of the 11-mile industrial area, you observed a vehicle parked suspiciously in the vicinity of the business premises Western Diesel.

Upon further investigation you identified two males acting suspiciously and who eventually attempted to break into the premises. The arrest by you of one of the males led to the identity and arrest of the two other co-offenders and the subsequent recovery of stolen property.

Your active patrolling, powers of observation and determination have resulted in the apprehension of offenders on premises and the clear up of other serious crime.

I congratulate you on your dedication to duty and this letter acknowledges your outstanding performance.

Paul White
Commissioner of Police 



Commissioners Letter of Recognition – ACPO Ben Pascoe & ACPO Jamie Wright

I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge your commitment to policing as a member stationed at Maningrida and in particular your efforts in making a positive impact on curtailing illicit drug use within that community.

Since September 2002 Maningrida police succeeded in targeting drug-related offences with a total of 77 recorded incidents relating to drug arrests or inquiries, during that time.

These efforts are significant and certainly highlight your dedication to duty. As Commissioner, it is pleasing to know that members of your calibre are clearly making a positive difference in bush communities.

Paul White
Commissioner
14 July 2004 

 


Commissioners Commendation: ACPO Katie April Young

In recognition of conspicuous performance when, on 19 March 2004, while off duty you responded to a call for assistance, and on attending found a man having difficulty breathing. You assessed the situation and assisted the man prior to calling St John Ambulance. Shortly after, the man stopped breathing and you commenced cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, which you maintained until the arrival of the St John personnel.

Your actions are a credit to you and reflect highly on the Northern Territory Police.

Paul White
Commissioner of Police
5th August 2004

 

 



Commissioners Commendation: ACPO Phillip William Perkins

In recognition of conspicuous performance when, on 23 February 2004, you attended a reported fire in Driver Avenue, Palmerston. The residential unit was full of smoke and you became aware that there was a person inside. The semi-conscious person was carried to safety by your colleagues and, without hesitation or concern for your own safety, you entered the smoke-filled unit with Constables Currie, Finch, Whiting and Stanley to verify there were no other occupants.

Your actions are a credit to you and reflect highly on the Northern Territory Police.

Paul White
Commissioner of Police
 

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